All Articles Critical Care Nursing new grad nurse

Night Shift vs. Day Shift Typical Routine

*Official post released on 12/16/2020

In this second part of our night and day shift series, we’ll take a look at what my typical nursing routine looks like for each of the two types of shift. This is likely different for every nurse, but I’ve kind of honed in on a routine that seems to work for me nearly every time. Of course, I’ll have some extras in my routine that you likely won’t have, but the same concept can still apply to you. You’re going to notice that there are quite a few commonalities between my approaches to the two different shifts. To kick things off, first we’ll start with my day shift routine.

Typical Day Shift Routine

  • 0430-0445: Wake up, shower, and get dressed for the shift
  • 0515: Pack my meal, post NCLEX & CCRN questions-of-the-day
  • 0530: Make breakfast to-go
  • 0545: Leave for work (my commute is 30-45 minutes depending on the location I’m working at)
  • 0615-0630: De-stress in the car and finish up any unanswered NCLEX/CCRN questions
  • 0640: Head inside, put belongings away, and change into surgical scrubs if assigned to a Covid unit
  • 0653: Clock in and get report; sometimes I get report early and clock in when the time hits 0653
  • 0700-1000: Initial assessments, chart 8 o’clocks, give AM meds, provide and assist with breakfast if applicable or change tube feedings, and give updates to physicians during rounds
  • 1200: Noon assessments, charting, meds, etc. Provide and assist patient with lunch. Read up on patient notes/entries as time allows.
  • 1600: 4 o’clock assessments, charting, meds, provide updates to physicians and other disciplines as the make end of day rounds
  • 1730: Jot down important updates for the charge RN and oncoming RN; chart intake and output, tidy up patient’s room
  • 1845-1930: Give change of shift report
  • 1930-2015: Commute back home
  • 2030: Dinner with husband, puppy cuddles, de-stress, watch an hour of TV, post answers to the NCLEX & CCRN question-of-the-day
  • 2130: Bed time!

Typical Night Shift Routine

  • 1600: Wake up, shower, and get dressed for the shift
  • 1645: Pack my meal, post NCLEX & CCRN question-of-the-day answers
  • 1700: Make dinner to-go
  • 1715-1730: Leave for work (my commute is 30-45 minutes depending on the location I’m working at)
  • 1800-1815: De-stress in the car and finish up any unanswered NCLEX/CCRN questions
  • 1825: Head inside, put belongings away, and change into surgical scrubs if assigned to a Covid unit
  • 1853: Clock in and get report; sometimes I get report early and clock in when the time hits 1853
  • 1900-2200: Initial assessments, chart 8 o’clocks, give PM meds, and do bed baths for continent patients
  • 0000: Midnight assessments, charting, meds, etc. Read up on patient notes/entries as time allows.
  • 0400: 4 o’clock assessments, charting, meds, draw labs, and do bed baths for patient who are incontinent
  • 0530: Check lab results, jot down important updates for the charge RN and oncoming RN; chart intake and output, tidy up patient’s room
  • 0645-0730: Give change of shift report
  • 0730-0815: Commute back home
  • 0830: Breakfast, puppy cuddles, de-stress, post NCLEX & CCRN questions-of-the-day
  • 0930: Bed time!

I put this photo of the “Anatomy of a Nurse” in here for a little comic relief. It’s hilarious and, at times, completely truthful. Remember that no matter which shift you chose to work, there will be benefits and downsides to each. Your attitude can make or break your shift, so be sure to approach the next 12 hours with a fresh mind. It’ll be better for your patients and yourself, trust me. Until next time, happy studying!

XOXO,

Andra Alyse

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

<span>%d</span> bloggers like this: